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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I seriously need some advice about barking.My girls are just brilliant dogs,friendly( and thats an understatement) obedient and get on well with dogs and even cats but when i have them out on a walk their barking is becoming a serious problem.The american cockers defiantely start it,my american cockapoo and tibetan terrier join in but rarely my english cockapoos but its sooooo embarrassing extremely loud and for someone ho doesnt kno them they coould easily be mistaken for being aggressive,it sounds it but definately isnt,they just want to play and its becoming a big game,its like they are saying hey guys here comes another dog lets go and bark at that one and see what he does!!! When they are are the lead they walk beautifully and ive had so many compliments how i make walking 6 dogs on the lead look easy but its not me,they are just great on the lead......until they see another dog oh boy the noise is deafening,pleeeeese someone give me some advice lol.I did get a behaviourist but she told me to reward the silence but they soon realised barking meant food so they went silent for the food then barked some more,little monkeys!!! xxxx
 

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I read somewhere about 'naming the problem', which involves teaching them to bark on command and then rewarding that. Apparently, they will then realise that they should only bark on command.

However, I have taught Rosie to bark on command and it has made no difference at all. And when I think about it, she has been sitting on command since we first got her, but it doesn't stop her sitting at other times, when she wants to. And, in fact, when she wants something, she sits down immmeidately in case I will reward her with whatever it is she wants. So I think that is complete rubbish!

So , sorry - I'm absolutely no help at all!
 

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Louise you may not have helped ... but I was fun to read....

Mine bark but only for a reason .. Oakley barks when anyone walks or drives on the drive, guard dog style cockapoo... Honey bark at people on teh other side of teh street, basically anyone she want to get closer to .. and Eevee barks at Honey and Oakley .. full on barking mad going on... but they are not yappy thank goodness.

Would rather a bark than a growl ... happy barking

Ok well I haven't helped you out either .. sorry Mandy xxxx
 

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Louise xxxxxxxxxxxx

Mandy - there are several types of bark - I have sourced some of this info from other web-sites:

Warning/Alert: It is natural for a dog to bark when someone is at the door or when strangers pass the house or car. Many will bark if they sense some type of threat, proclaiming "I'm here protecting this place so don't mess with me." The sound of this bark is usually sharp, loud and authoritative. Honing this instinct with training can help protect your home and family.

Anxiety: Anxious barking often seems to be an an act of self-soothing for many dogs. It is often high-pitched and sometimes accompanied by whining. This type of barking is common for dogs with separation anxiety.

Playfulness/Excitement: This type of barking is especially common in puppies and young dogs. Many dogs will bark while playing with people or other dogs. Even the sound of the bark tends to sound upbeat and possibly musical. Some dogs will bark excitedly when they know they are about to go for a walk or car ride.

Attention-seeking: When you hear this bark, you will usually know just what it means. This bark says "Hey! Hey! Look! Here I am!" Other dogs may whine and bark together to get attention, almost like the tone of a whining child.

Boredom: The bark of a bored dog sounds like a dog that barks just to hear her own voice. Though it tends to be annoying, it is also kind of sad. Bored dogs often bark to release excess energy, and sometimes bark out of loneliness. They usually need an activity and perhaps even a companion.

Responding to Other Dogs: This is probably a familiar scenario - one dog down the street starts barking, and one by one the rest of your road joins in....a Mexican Wave of barking.

If you can try and isolate which of the above being used - this is ideally for the first dog barking - the others follow suit and can turn a "Warning" bark from Dog One into an "Excitement" bark from Dog Two and / or even a "Responding" bark from Dog Three etc etc.

We personally do not like our dogs barking - for us nor the neighbours - and have let them know what we think when and if they do kick-off. Nowdays it is normally to inform me of something - the other week one of the smallest puppies had got under the bar dividers in The Dog House and was standing outside the whole kennel unit at 5am - Pippa in the next run sent out the alarm (constant warning bark) until I responded (Good Girl xxxxxx) - none of the others joined in - as they seemed to know Pippa was dealing with it.

With regards to any barking - we do take steps to find a reason - but other than that we take on the role of a bigger grumpier dog and "bark" back if one starts (a dominant assertive "NO!" in a barkish tone) - it works very well for us - as can be verified by our visitors - none apparently aware of the dogs we have here until we open the gate from the decking - and there they all are ! xxxxxx

Stephen xx
 

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Louise xxxxxxxxxxxx

Mandy - there are several types of bark - I have sourced some of this info from other web-sites:

Warning/Alert: It is natural for a dog to bark when someone is at the door or when strangers pass the house or car. Many will bark if they sense some type of threat, proclaiming "I'm here protecting this place so don't mess with me." The sound of this bark is usually sharp, loud and authoritative. Honing this instinct with training can help protect your home and family.

Anxiety: Anxious barking often seems to be an an act of self-soothing for many dogs. It is often high-pitched and sometimes accompanied by whining. This type of barking is common for dogs with separation anxiety.

Playfulness/Excitement: This type of barking is especially common in puppies and young dogs. Many dogs will bark while playing with people or other dogs. Even the sound of the bark tends to sound upbeat and possibly musical. Some dogs will bark excitedly when they know they are about to go for a walk or car ride.

Attention-seeking: When you hear this bark, you will usually know just what it means. This bark says "Hey! Hey! Look! Here I am!" Other dogs may whine and bark together to get attention, almost like the tone of a whining child.

Boredom: The bark of a bored dog sounds like a dog that barks just to hear her own voice. Though it tends to be annoying, it is also kind of sad. Bored dogs often bark to release excess energy, and sometimes bark out of loneliness. They usually need an activity and perhaps even a companion.

Responding to Other Dogs: This is probably a familiar scenario - one dog down the street starts barking, and one by one the rest of your road joins in....a Mexican Wave of barking.

If you can try and isolate which of the above being used - this is ideally for the first dog barking - the others follow suit and can turn a "Warning" bark from Dog One into an "Excitement" bark from Dog Two and / or even a "Responding" bark from Dog Three etc etc.

We personally do not like our dogs barking - for us nor the neighbours - and have let them know what we think when and if they do kick-off. Nowdays it is normally to inform me of something - the other week one of the smallest puppies had got under the bar dividers in The Dog House and was standing outside the whole kennel unit at 5am - Pippa in the next run sent out the alarm (constant warning bark) until I responded (Good Girl xxxxxx) - none of the others joined in - as they seemed to know Pippa was dealing with it.

With regards to any barking - we do take steps to find a reason - but other than that we take on the role of a bigger grumpier dog and "bark" back if one starts (a dominant assertive "NO!" in a barkish tone) - it works very well for us - as can be verified by our visitors - none apparently aware of the dogs we have here until we open the gate from the decking - and there they all are ! xxxxxx

Stephen xx
 

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Sounds like they are over excited Mandy. As you say they are all friendly with other dogs so probably just want to play.

If you think certain it's the American girls starting it ,maybe isolate them from group walks so that you take them separately.

Do what your behaviourist has instructed you or I have heard distraction techniques like taking a favourite toy out with you can help desensitise them when other dogs are approaching.

I know it means more walkies but if you can perhaps get the American girls to be calmer and less reactive when you introduce them back into the pack for group walkies hopefully it won't set the others off.
 

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As everyone who was at 'Poo Fest '11 will tell you, Dylan is quite possibly the noisiest dog on the planet. I don't think he stopped barking and howling for the entire time we were there. In the house he's completely quiet, it's just when he's excited and playing that he barks and howls with joy. I think it's his toy poodle dad that's responsible and I've not tried to stop him because I would feel like I was spoiling his fun. It's just so much a part of his nature. However there are times when I would love him to shut up! I don't have a solution, I'm afraid. You could try a water spray - that's what they used at the dog training classes I went to. Sometimes I'll anticipate when he's about to howl (for example if he has a ball or stick he'll drop it then howl for me to throw it) and say a firm NO to stop him. That usually works. The cockapoo species seems to be divided into noisy and quiet, and I know which one I've got :rolleyes:
 

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I was waiting for you to join this thread, Helen!

I agree - with Dylan it is definitely excitement. It was almost like he was trying to shout WOOOOHOOOO!!!!!

WIth Rosie, I think it fall into both the anxiety and the attention-seeking categories that Stephen has discussed. Although she will do most of the other types of barking at various times, it's not to any significant extent. However, if she is put in her cage while something else is going on in the house (e.g. getting the kids ready in the morning), she starts with a sort of hoarse whine/bark and within a few seconds is barking at full volume.
 

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What an interesting thread. Izzy barks at some other dogs and I find it very embarrassing, particularly if the other owner treats me as if I have not brought up my dog correctly. If she is off lead she will run up to the dog gleefully and bark furiously, retreat, run back, bark etc. This will go on until either the dog aggresses back or walks off and ignores her, it the dog retorts she runs back to me scared, yelping and hides. If she is on the lead she pulls in the dogs direction barking furiously. She never does this if she knows the dog; with new dogs it is hit and miss, always barks at big dogs, usually jack russels and border terriers, rarely cockers but usually springers!

As a caring owner I have tried lots of approaches. I take her once a week to a local kennels for socialisation (Facebook - Bunkersland - for lovely doggy play photos). The owner introduces Izzy to all sorts of dogs and, of course, she doesn't behave in that way when she is there. I am on my third training course. I have tried positive reinforcement to manage the behaviour - generally can't penetrate it. My trainer has suggested dog correction spray, so I will be trying that soon. So if anyone has managed to crack this type of behaviour I will be very pleased to try. Xx
 

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As everyone who was at 'Poo Fest '11 will tell you, Dylan is quite possibly the noisiest dog on the planet. I don't think he stopped barking and howling for the entire time we were there. In the house he's completely quiet, it's just when he's excited and playing that he barks and howls with joy
Dyan's bark/howl isn't annoying like a continual yap yap yap though. Its quite a funny bark and its obviously done in a fun mood! :D:D
 

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Flossy will be 14 weeks old on Monday and she still has not barked yet, are we just lucky or dont they normally bark at her age, sorry thats about my 5th stupid question. :eek:
 

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Maisie (American cockapoo) is a barker at home, not out, and its a mix of warning/alert barking and anxiety barking. We live on a quiet road and she will bark if she hears something outside, a car door shutting, someone in the garden next door, a van driving by, as well as someone arriving at the door, and it does get annoying.

Also she often takes a while to settle after a walk and can be barky once home. We have had some success with a water squirter and a firm, but not cross, "quiet".

The DK "Guide to Raising a Puppy" book suggests squirting with a solution made up of mainly water with a little white vinegar in it (not enough to sting eyes but just enough so you can smell it). I haven't tried this as it seems a bit unkind.

Has anyone had success with water squirting or any other method??? I'm hoping to get any undesired behaviours like this dealt with (some hope!) before new puppy arrives mid-August. Last thing I want is new pup copying!!!!!
 

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Rosie started barking and barking outside 5 minutes ago, and with Stephen's tale of barking being an alert to a dangerous situation in my mind, I quickly diagnosed it as a danger/guard-dog bark and rushed out to see what terrible thing she was alerting me to. Sure enough, there on the driveway, was an enormous, scary LEAF!!!

Daft dog.
 

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Rosie started barking and barking outside 5 minutes ago, and with Stephen's tale of barking being an alert to a dangerous situation in my mind, I quickly diagnosed it as a danger/guard-dog bark and rushed out to see what terrible thing she was alerting me to. Sure enough, there on the driveway, was an enormous, scary LEAF!!!

Daft dog.
its so funny what they react to. Silly things on our walks like a bin bag next to a bin or a car parked where there isn't usually one. I always praise Dylan for barking a warning because he's doing what he is supposed to and one day he could be alerting us to a real danger.
 

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Oakley has a fear of bin bags .... he goes mad every day I change the kitchen bin bag ... or barks at me when I carry the full bag out to the outside bin, been like it since he was 6 weeks old, strange fear but I just try to calm him and shake the bag gently as possible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Rosie started barking and barking outside 5 minutes ago, and with Stephen's tale of barking being an alert to a dangerous situation in my mind, I quickly diagnosed it as a danger/guard-dog bark and rushed out to see what terrible thing she was alerting me to. Sure enough, there on the driveway, was an enormous, scary LEAF!!!

Daft dog.
hahahahahahaha:D:D:D:D:D
 
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