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Discussion Starter #1
Throughout the day chance has been having these episodes where he goes completely crazy!!
He bites us, jumps on us and doesn't stop. He speeds across the room growling and barking. He has even started chewing furniture. I had been using a mesh playpen but haven't been able to close it because he chews and digs it breaking it until let out. Now I don't even know how or where to keep him under control. It's like he's ruling us because I'm starting to become afraid of my 10 week old baby!
How do I reprimand him or teach him a lesson? Is he becoming vicious?! :mad::eek:
Plz help!!!
 

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I'd suggest getting rid of mesh for a while. My two could tear into mesh in a split second with their razor sharp teeth. I used a metal pen and blocked off space for them when I wasn't right there (though I mostly was) at that age. I'd also think about what triggers. Has he been confined for a bit, doesn't have as much attention, tired? Lexi and Beemer became especially crazy when they were tired. And mostly, I think pretty much everyone's puppy has their crazy crockapoo moments. Keep him busy with training - teach him that he gets rewards for doing what you want him to. It gets better. As for reprimanding - I would just give them an "uh uh" and "no thank you", ignore when it escalates, and then put them in their crates when it got really bad (though I'd let them run out of steam) and they would crash pretty quick. And it does get better. I know how hard it seems in the moment, but their sweetness is still under all that fluff of crazy.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the replies, I read the other post and it seems pretty much what other ppl were describing. I definitely need a metal crate just because I need to teach him right from wrong and I think this will b the way since he hates being confined. This is going to be a challenge because I know how much he's going to hate it!
He does get tired and loves attention but I can't wait to see more of his sweetness and start being able to manage this craaazy teething stage!
:)
 

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Remember too that he's just a baby and he can't control himself yet. Everything is new and can be overwhelming - lots of naps needed which he won't be able to regulate himself. As others will say, sleep is a huge part of the equation! Generally speaking try to ignore the bad (rather than tell him off) and reward the good. Puppies want your attention so this works well

There are times when you will need to redirect him. If he is chewing furniture we give an interrupting noise 'ahbabah!' And then distract with a toy and praise when he bites on this. You can buy bitter apple spray for furniture to deter him which may help

with a nip on the skin you can do a high pitched 'ow' and replace with a toy or turn away for a few seconds, or leave the room very briefly if it persists.

with the trouser grabbing ignoring works best otherwise if you reprimand it can become part of a game! Standing still usually makes you less interesting

The nipping and trouser leg grabbing is something we all go through. It stops briefly after the first teeth are through and then happens again as the second come through then disappears once they're through

We had a tip not to give squeaky toys to the puppy as the squeak is not dissimilar to a child squealing 'ow' as the puppy nips and it could be conflicting that you are encouraging the puppy to bite into something that makes this sound. This doesn't seem to be the general opinion held considering the amount of squeaky puppy toys but I have to say it makes sense to me!
 

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Also make sure he is eating a good quality puppy food.

A lot of puppy food is not good quality, it's the equivalent of junk food. In people a poor diet can contribute to behaviour so it's possible it could in dogs

Not saying this is the case here, but always worth making sure all the areas are covered
 

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He isn't doing it to be naughty and it is no indication that he will be bitey in any way when he's older. It is usually a combination over being over tired and teething!

I tried everything to teach Tilly biting was wrong; saying OUCH, time outs, ignoring, hold her muzzle, ultimately, I don't think they can learn its wrong until they start to naturally grow out of it (which he definitely will!)

Hang in there, this is the toughest part - it's the reason I don't want another dog!
 

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Hang in there, this is the toughest part - it's the reason I don't want another dog!
True. It may not seem it now but it will get better. I think all of us first time puppy owners wondered whether we'd allowed a monster in to our homes but it passes.

I think puppies are just hard wired to go ape no matter what they need - there's no proper brain at work yet. Hungry?: go ape. Tired?: go ape. Need the wee?: etc. etc. It will sort itself out. Just stay consistent - Praise the good, ignore the bad and drink more.;)
 

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We don't crate and never have. To be honest I haven't experienced the really bitey going mad stage either, so I've either been very lucky, or very careful to give the puppies the sleep and rest they need. I also always substitute my hand for a bone or hard toy for them to gnaw on, when they need to bite due to teething. Never laugh. At them when they are tugging at your clothes. Or anyone else's. You all have to be consistent on what is allowed and what isn't. Everyone in the house has to reinforce the rules. I Am in the lucky position of being able to sit quietly and cuddle my dogs when they are tired. A word of warning.....NEVER use the crate as a punishment. It's supposed to be a safe secure place for your puppy to rest.
 

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Thanks for the replies, I read the other post and it seems pretty much what other ppl were describing. I definitely need a metal crate just because I need to teach him right from wrong and I think this will b the way since he hates being confined. This is going to be a challenge because I know how much he's going to hate it!
He does get tired and loves attention but I can't wait to see more of his sweetness and start being able to manage this craaazy teething stage!
:)

I meant to clarify, they slept in their crates so when I put them in there they knew it was a cue to sleep and rest and it was their safe place. My poos would walk in on their own so you want to make it a positive experience. I agree with others that it shouldn't be a punishment. He is just a baby and it really helped me when I thought about it with the framework that every accident, destroyed object, or any other "bad" behavior by them was because of what I did or didn't do. Just like my sister couldn't blame my nephew when he peed on her while she changed his diaper as he was only a baby, I couldn't blame my puppies for when I was missing the signs or reinforcing behavior that I didn't like. It very much helps to shift thinking about it from punishment to reinforcing positive behaviors as with punishment they will go right back to it when you are not looking.

Teach them to do the opposite and then they get a reward. I taught my two how to sit and lay down the first week I had them. They learned to sit before I put down their food bowl. They come right to the area with their treats and they automatically sit. They will sit before I open a door or now they look and ask permission from me before they get to go out (this is biting me in the butt a bit as they won't use the doggy door unless I tell them it's ok and defeats the purpose of the doggy door). He can't be running around all crazy if he is sitting or laying down in order to get a treat. I also had rope toys because I wanted them to play with me, not just each other. They've grown out of them but when they were small they loved them and kept them a bit separated while I still got to play with them. I would handle their mouth and often swipe my finger in there to make sure they weren't chewing on something they shouldn't. Also started cleaning their teeth. They still aren't fans of the teeth cleaning but I have pulled out crap they chew on from underneath their tongues, in their cheek, etc., and they just sit while I do it. Maybe because I had two so I always had to carry them facing away from me. So I learned to scoop them up from behind and when they get too crazy I would do that and then rock them and sing Disney tunes to help them calm down. Once at daycare, the people there were surprised how they would regulate themselves between play and sleep unlike other dogs that age. I think between helping them calm down and making sure they got very regular naps throughout the day early on, they just got used to it when they went to daycare. I also wanted them to know that my hands and being held by me was always about love so that they would never be afraid of me. It wasn't always easy. And I still have moments of frustration and momentary feelings of hopelessness. But the support from these wonderful people on ILMC was tremendous help. But my puppies almost a year old are the sweetest most loving beings. All they want to do is play with you and kiss you.

Sorry for the long post. Lying with Lexi curled up next to me and Beemer happily sleeping on hi bed near my feet makes me want to talk about them even more. :D


Sent from Petguide.com Free App
 

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Hope you are having a better day today. It seems to me that acutally often how we view our puppy's behaviour does depend slightly on how we are feeling :D

Everyone else has already said it all, just wanted to say - we've all felt your pain!
Your chap is a baby dog, baby dogs' play involves teeth - they do learn bite inhibition eventually.
Stay calm, be consistent, praise rather than punish and above all let your pup sleep! You are aiming at 18-20 hours in a 24 hour period. That is a heck of a lot of sleep. Half an hours play, outside for a wee, shut behind a baby gate or in a puppy pen with a few chew toys and peace and quiet and he'll probably crash out. Leave him alone he'll probably sleep for 2-3 hours. As they get older their need for sleep drops off a bit, but also your training will start to pay off and he will become calmer.
Don't give up.
Remember Stay calm, be consistent, praise rather than punish and above all let your pup sleep! and always be gentle- he is just a little, little guy he will learn.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for your reply...ILMC has definitely helped with the frustrations and your replies help me see I'm not alone in the puppy madness lol.
Chance also learned to sit already, and he does it before feeding him or a treat aswell, and those are parts of the wonderful lil moments. :)
 

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Glad you are seeing the positive in Yami:D Molly learned to sit the first few days we had her I used her kibble as treats. The she learned down in no time and that one is harder. They are very smart. Short training sessions work great when they are young cause they can't concentrate too long. Also if you can take him to puppy socials that will help a lot too. We used to take Molly and it would completely tire her out. She didn't have all her shots but all the puppies were the same so it was safe and a good way to socialize.:D
 

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We have had a terrible winter here and many days it has been too cold and too stormy (75 km/h winds with blowing snow) to take puppy out longer than for the time it takes to pee and poo. Those days made for some challenging behaviour because she needed more exercise - tired puppies go wild but so do bored puppies! Now that it is still very wintery but not so extreme I have her out for longer walks as often as I can manage in a day and her behaviour is much better most of the time.
 
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