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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I am new here an would first like to say HI and then ask for some advice about my 7 year old cockapoo, Tootsie.

Today is a bittersweet day for me as I just lost my 17 year old bichon from what the doctor said could have been cancer but I know she is now out of pain and in better hands now. I also have a cockapoo and a pomeranian (Priss). I guess when something bad happens you become overprotective and want to make sure that something does not happen to the other girls you have and when I started checking Tootsie I noticed that she had a couple of fat pads on her upper chest. When I was in the vet's office this morning I asked him about the fat pads that were on our bichon and he just said they were innocent fat pads and not to be concerned but after what happened today I just cannot lose another family member.

Has anyone had any experience with cockapoo's having fat pads?

Glenn
 

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Poor you Glen. I haven't any experience of this as my poo is still young but I guess as with us or any animal as they get older they are more prone to putting on a bit of extra fat. Would a lite/senoir diet help, maybe get rid of those fatty bits? Fat is something we can do something about, especially for our animals, as we are in charge of what and how much they eat. Perhaps just a few minor adjustments with diet and exercise, the amount of fatty tissue can be lost?
Try not to worry about the rest of your dogs too much and I am sorry for the loss of your bichon.
 

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hey welcome, sorry about your buchon.


i would say that the fat lumps are just fat, it is more likly you bichon had internal cancer on her organs etc and for 17 that is a fab age for her to have gotten too.

what i would do, is cut down your other twos meals and up their walking to get the weight off them as that will help their helth anyway. but i would worry about them.

what food are they on?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the responses. I am feeding her CHICKEN SOUP FOR THE SOUL food and even though she is a picky eater she eats it. I feed her senior hard food in the morning and in the evening I will give her the hard food mixed with a spoonful of soft food.

Please let me know if you feel there is a better food out there which I could give them.

Thanks
 

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personaly i would cut them down to one meal or reduce the amount you give them in each meal.
 

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Although I have no experience with Cockapoos, I do have experience of other dogs. Fatty deposits do not necessarily relate to the overall health/ weight of the dog- they are just places of fatty deposits. Obviously dogs should not be allowed to become overweight but do not feel guilty if your dog has these and is a healthy weight.
Also, some dogs need to have their food spread out over the day to stabilise blood sugar levels, just monitor amount of food against exercise.
 

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I just joined this site today. My 4 year old has a spot on his upper chest about the size of a quarter. I was going to have the vet check it this week. I am glad I read this post because I had a feeling that's what it was- a fat deposit. Thanks.
 

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personaly i would cut them down to one meal or reduce the amount you give them in each meal.
You are better to cut down the quantity of food in each meal rather than the number of meals you feed, cutting down to 1 meal can actually have the opposite effect and cause them to retain weight. :smile2:

With regards to the lumps, have the vet check them to put your mind at ease- you can have a fine needle aspirate(FNA) done to determine whether it is fatty (or if not what it actually is) which will give ou an idea of whether to have it removed or not. Fatty lumps don't always need to be removed but depending on the location and rate of growth they may be better taken off. The trickiest place is the axilla (armpit) as by the time they are big enough to effect the dogs walking, they are often too big to remove completely and all that can be done is to debulk the mass.

Voice your concerns to the vet and they will be able to give you advice more specific to your pet :)
 
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