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Hi

I have a lovely garden and a great lawn - but the puppy is quckly turning it into something out of The Somme! Dug up grass, big, deep holes, moss, mud everywhere! Is there anything I can do to prevent her doing this. Poppy is almost 5 months old and she has done this almost since the begginning. Is this normal? Should I just give up?

Any help would be most appreciated.

Thanks

Teresa
x
 

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It is normal, and mine looks the same. I have given up. My lawn and my pots are wrecked.:mad:

There is actually another thread on this as recently as last week I think that you might want to look at. It has some interesting info in it on a couple of the posts that are worth reading.
 

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Hello,

Ryley starting doing this at around 5 months - very annoying, especially when he jumps straight on my cream sofas :eek:

I saw a tip on a puppy programme the other day. Blow a balloon up (not to full size, palm size-ish). Bury it where the puppy's digging and next time he/she digs he'll get a shock when it bursts.

Brilliant! I thought. I did this then got worried he might choke on the burst balloon so I watched him carefully when he was in the garden.

He saw the balloon poking out of the ground next time he started digging, very carefully dug around it, picked it up gently in his teeth and ran across the garden to play with it!!! :mad: Maybe it'll work with your pup - worth a go!!

My next attempt was one of those anti-bark spray cans, which helps!
 

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"Digging" is in fact one of the basic needs of any dog - it's as wired into their system as hunting, feeding, rest and play etc etc - so in reality it should be brought into your dog's "play time" as a fun activity - and with gentle persuasion, and positive reinforcement, they can learn quickly which part of your garden is "diggable" and which parts are out of bounds.

It all comes under the banner of EMRA - as detailed on the CCGB, follow this link for a fuller explaination:

http://www.cockapooclubgb.co.uk/****...sic-needs.html

Hope this helps.

Stephen X
 

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Could not get your link to work Stephen - but totally agree digging can be a basic need and far better to use positive reinforcement to guide the dog into more acceptable places.

Using punishment like bursting balloons and spray collars can have far reaching consequences and could end up with your puppy being scared of the garden or other items you did not intend.

Neighbours left a dog in kennels and from his behaviour he had a spray collar used on him - he came back too scared to go into the garden on his own, ran if anyone used a deodorant spray can in the room and generally a shadow of his former happy confident self.
 

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Monty used to dig last summer when he was a pup - not seen him dig since so maybe they grow out of it? We will fix our lawn this year and hope his digging urge does not return!!

Good luck but maybe just hope he stops and fix it up later. Dogs are great for wrecking houses and gardens but we love them anyway!!
 

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A timely post... not a great quality picture as taken on my blackberry but if you look closely you'll see that Saffi was 'helping' my parents with the gardening all day. She had a ball!

 

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Using punishment like bursting balloons and spray collars can have far reaching consequences and could end up with your puppy being scared of the garden or other items you did not intend.
Just to clarify - I did not and would not use a spray collar. It was an anti-bark spray can which I let off at the back door while the pup was digging at the end of the garden. It does no more than make them stop what they're doing and pay you attention. Is in no way harmful, unless of course you let it off in their ear.

As for the balloon trick - that was recommended on a recent puppy programme on TV that many of us watched. I've learnt that what worked at first (yelping to prevent play biting, smacking a newspaper on a coffee table, or a different tone of voice) eventually starts having little effect and new techniques are sometimes needed!
 

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Our vet nurse came up with a great idea get a child's sand pit and bury some dog toys in it.

Train your dog so it knows that the sand pit is doggy digging. It also a good way to get them to find the toy and bring it to you. Then hide them in the sand pit again but in different places so the game becomes more stimulating.

Alternatively, create a courtyard effect with some stunning tegular block sets, an array of planting pockets, hey presto you've just created the doggy version of Silverstone.... Great fun to run around. Nice robust bamboo or pampass grass are great for humans to hide behind.

Kxx
 

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Our vet nurse came up with a great idea get a child's sand pit and bury some dog toys in it.

Train your dog so it knows that the sand pit is doggy digging. It also a good way to get them to find the toy and bring it to you. Then hide them in the sand pit again but in different places so the game becomes more stimulating.
Kxx
That's a brilliant idea! :smile: We don't have a garden big enough to corner off a whole area for the dog! We have fields behind us but horses are on them and they've broken our neighbour's dog's leg in the past so I won't let him out there. Shame - he could dig to his heart's content just the other side of my fence!
 
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