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Discussion Starter #1
So, at last night's puppy party, it was all about positive training and ignoring bad behaviour, but I asked what you could do if the behaviour was something you couldn't ignore, like jumping up at children, or jumping up at the dinner table. As she was working with her own treats (I'd forgotten to bring mine) Rosie's sensitive tummy meant she couldn't be used for the demonstration :(

So, Pheobe, the chocolate lab from last week (whose ear Rosie had bitten - I was glad to see there was no lasting damage!) was used. The trainer walked up to her calling her name and Pheobe obligingly jumped up her, all excited. The trainer then, behind her back, shook a little metal tin filled with marbles that she was holding, which startled Pheobe. She then, with her other hand (which was holding the treat) lured Pheobe into a sit (Pheobe already knew how to sit) and treated her.

She repeated this and the very next time, Pheobe immediately sat down when the box was shaken. The next two times were identical, Pheobe jumped up but immediately sat down. The fifth time - she DID NOT JUMP UP!!! She went running up to the trainer and just sat down. Absolutely amazing.

So, I'm on the hunt now for a metal sweet tin and some marbles. Apparently, a water spray works just as well and is better for if you need to do it from a distance (although I guess your visitors might complain!), but this doesn't work on 'water dogs'. I think Spaniels and Poodles would both be classed as water dogs, wouldn't they?

I'm going to put the master plan into action on Saturday, as I'll be in charge of Rosie for three days on the trot, so I can keep it consistent for a while. I'll let you know how it goes!
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I forgot to say that she advised doing this for at least three or four days EVERY time the dog jumped up. She said if you only do it with certain people, then the dog will only learn not to jump up those people. I am going to have to stick to Rosie's side and carry my shaker at all times!

Louise
 

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The shaker is a great idea. Turning your back on them until they sit works well sometimes. I don't like the water spray technique - I went to a training class where the trainer kept spraying dogs everytime they barked and everytime she did it I thought if she does that to Flo I will take the spray off her and spray her in the face. Needless to say we stopped going to that group. Watch out with the shaker that it doesn't scare an already timid dog into submissive urination whenever someone visits!!!!!!

Now I'm no expert but I think that jumping up can be just because they are friendly but it can also be something a submissive dog will do as an act of appeasement - submissive dogs lick the corners of top dogs mouths(I've seen Flo do this and she also also rolls over readily if a larger, older dog comes up to her) and jumping up is a way of trying to get to your face/mouth to appease/befriend you.
 

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With Rosie, I think the reason is a bit more basic - she jumps on the dinner table because it is a child-sized table and so the food is tantalisingly close to her and she jumps up at the kids because they are normally going bananas around her and getting her over-excited.

I'm going to try not feeding the kids at their little table any more, but trying to get them to calm down around her is impossible, so I will try separating them when she gets too excitable (sometimes I think that even the best-trained dog would jump up at the kids, when they are chasing her around the garden and running away with her toys etc) and will try using the shaker at all other times.

She's not timid at all really - she does have a bit of leakiness when my husband gets home in the evening (he feels like a rock star - she pees with excitement and then rolls over at his feet and shows him her lady bits!) but she's never like that with me and the kids. It's definitely an excited jumping up - she then bounds around the place and bows down and races off to get a toy, then races back over and jumps up again. The only time I've seen her properly submissive was when we took her to meet my sister's dog yesterday, at my sister's house and Oscar gave the biggest, deepest growl I've ever heard when she came bounding over! She immediately crouched down and then rolled on her side to let him know she wasn't going to be taking the matter any further!
 

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With Rosie, I think the reason is a bit more basic - she jumps on the dinner table because it is a child-sized table and so the food is tantalisingly close to her and she jumps up at the kids because they are normally going bananas around her and getting her over-excited.

I'm going to try not feeding the kids at their little table any more, but trying to get them to calm down around her is impossible, so I will try separating them when she gets too excitable (sometimes I think that even the best-trained dog would jump up at the kids, when they are chasing her around the garden and running away with her toys etc) and will try using the shaker at all other times.

She's not timid at all really - she does have a bit of leakiness when my husband gets home in the evening (he feels like a rock star - she pees with excitement and then rolls over at his feet and shows him her lady bits!) but she's never like that with me and the kids. It's definitely an excited jumping up - she then bounds around the place and bows down and races off to get a toy, then races back over and jumps up again. The only time I've seen her properly submissive was when we took her to meet my sister's dog yesterday, at my sister's house and Oscar gave the biggest, deepest growl I've ever heard when she came bounding over! She immediately crouched down and then rolled on her side to let him know she wasn't going to be taking the matter any further!
Maybe your hubby doesn't mind if she wees then rolls over but... When your husband gets in he should completely ignore her - soooo difficult. That's what I do with Flo - I walk straight past her, even when she's bouncing all over the place and ignore her for 5 minutes until she has calmed down.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It is weird because it's different with him - she's nowhere near as jumpy as with the kids, it's very definitely a different type of behaviour. Possibly submissive, possibly just a different kind of excitement.

We only notice the pee after she's done it - she doesn't actually actively wee (no crouching down). We have just laughed about it so far as it's only happened a couple of times over the last few days. But now you mention it, it's not really going to be funny if she's still doing it in six months time! And, now I come to think of it, the times I've noticed have been when she's on the lino in the kitchen. Perhaps she's done it lots more, but it's been on the carpet - yuk!

I'm going to really watch her this evening to see if I can work out exactly what kind of behaviour she's demonstrating.
 
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