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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Don't get me wrong, i love our little Maisie and she's bring us lots of joy but every so often she just goes wild and crazed and growls and bites and scratches and won't stop!! We both look like we self harm!! We've tried distraction and shouting no but she just won't listen. Man, puppies are hard work! :eek::eek:

On the plus side she is toileting pretty well and last night slept from 11pm - 6am with no whimpering or barking at all :)
 

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Mable would have a mad half hour where she just charged around... presume they just have too much energy maybe thats what it is with Maisie. I think I'd just try engaging her in some sort of game or ball throwing or even get treats out and see if she'll respond to them and get her to work for them, unless by then she wont concentrate for training. If she's biting ,which puppies do, have a toy in your hand and encourage her to bite that rather your hand. Maybe keep a special squeeky toy which would distract her when she's like this, but then put it away after playing. Dont worry the phase wont last and yes puppies are hard work... but you'll get there x
 

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its just bing consistent.


try leaving a lead on her so you can get controle of her without having to touch her.

try screaming realy loud or set up a situation you know she will start bighting and keep someone about who can make a loud noise or back something noisey together to startle her.
 

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Dexter is angelic all day and turns into this crazy little biting monster for about an hour each evening. I either take him in the garden for lots of play or I give him a raw meaty veal bone. The bone is more effective as it really tires him out pulling and chewing at it. I'm afraid all of us with puppies are going through the same thing! (love the new photo Kendal)
 

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Don't get me wrong, i love our little Maisie and she's bring us lots of joy but every so often she just goes wild and crazed and growls and bites and scratches and won't stop!! We both look like we self harm!! We've tried distraction and shouting no but she just won't listen. Man, puppies are hard work! :eek::eek:
Hi Vic3112 - Could you describe these "outbursts" a little more ?
Do they come on all of a sudden ?
Do Maisie's eyes appear any different (during the aggression - and then after it) ?
Is it more like a "fit" of aggression as opposed to a "leave my things alone" protective bout ?
Does she come out of it as suddenly as she goes into one ?
Does she look sheepish and very sorry once the bout has ended ?

Lastly - what cross is she ? Is her Mum a Orange English Show Cocker ?

Stephen xx
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi Stephen, her mum is a black and tan show cocker.

Maisie will just be playing nicely with her toy and then discover that my hand is much more tasty to chew and will start chewing and biting me. I try to push her away with a harsh NO but she then starts to growl and bites me even more!! Her eyes don't look any different i don't think but he does seem to get very mad. Last night i put her in her pen for 'time out' and she quietened down within a couple of minutes and then licked my face as if to apologise.

She is fast asleep like a little angel now so me and hubby are quietly watching TV not daring to move :) x
 

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Hello Victoria - Beau went through this stage but it was always aimed at my daughter who is 17! She never growled but would bark at her and keep jumping up and biting her and wouldn't give up! She too looked like she had self-harmed! Our trainer then said that Madeleine (my daughter) needed to push her away with a firm "NO" and if she continued after one "NO" she got time out for a couple of minutes in another room where she couldn't see us. After a couple of days of being consistent with this she stopped as hates to be shut away from us. Good luck :)
 

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I think this is simply her puppy mad half hour as i call it and perhaps she is also seeing ho far she can push you which she has discovered ends up in time out so you are doing the right thing.The minute the rough behaviour starts end the game immediatey so she soon realises that the silly behaviour has no rewards.Most pups go through a silly mouthing stage but as long as its corrected ( as kendal mentioned making a loud noise to startle them and end the mouthing) it shouldnt last long xxxx
 

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I think this is just a phase all our puppies go through. For me it was usually for about 30mins after I had put the kids to bed in the evenings. I put it down to the fact that Obi was bored and annoyed at being ignored while I was seeing to the kids upstairs (Obi is not allowed upstairs). His play would quickly turn aggressive and a firm NO didn't seem to work. I tried putting him in another room to calm down but I always felt guilty and would go get him and he would start again! I discussed it with my trainer and she suggested taking him for a walk which isn't an option for me as a single parent. So, then she suggested doing an activity to "brain drain" him and so I got the treats out and started doing training sessions with him. It kept him focussed and after about 15-20mins he was much calmer. I still do this most evenings (whether he has gone bonkers or not!) and when we are done he has not only learnt something new but is then relaxed enough to just flop next to me on the sofa. :)

Try all the advice from everyone here and see what works for you.
 

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Its interesting to read that they all seem to have a "mad half hour". Maisie certainly did as a pup, and it was always in the evening. She would go mad shredding newspaper making the place look a complete mess, and would then flop! We didn't get the biting thing but they are all different.

I will use the tips other people have given, if needed, with new pup. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks a lot for the advice guys, i will keep persevering with the NO and time out. I have a gig tonight and feel a may have to explain my cuts and scratches to everyone haha :) x
 

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Hi Stephen, her mum is a black and tan show cocker.
Maisie will just be playing nicely with her toy and then discover that my hand is much more tasty to chew and will start chewing and biting me. I try to push her away with a harsh NO but she then starts to growl and bites me even more!! Her eyes don't look any different i don't think but he does seem to get very mad. Last night i put her in her pen for 'time out' and she quietened down within a couple of minutes and then licked my face as if to apologise.
OK - That sounds good - as the more severe version (hence my questions) could have been linked to "Rage Syndrome" - I say "could" as it is in itself rare - though none the less it does exist.

One suggestion (and it is only a suggestion - but it works for us and those that have chosen to use it) - is to put your hands around her muzzle (around her mouth keeping it closed) and gently squeeze until she pulls away - a more assertive pup will come back at you so do it again slightly harder - and again if need be - it is something YOU must win.


Dogs are pack animals and even when "play" fighting in their own litter they are actually working our who is top dog and what the pecking order is. Basically it is not a game to them - it is a way of working out their social structure.

If you bring a puppy who is dominant into your home and if it thinks it needs to be above You / your partner and mostly kids - it needs to be shown that it is the lowest in the pecking order.
A more dominant pup will take on a more assertive role within your household and as such will worry more; be more aggressive and snappy - it thinks it should be "looking after" You not the other way around.

If you observe dogs socially and if you watched pups with Mum when little - you will see Mum "correct" pups if they get too much - normally with a deep growl and "snap" at them - they soon learn and back down - this is effectively what YOU have to do - you need to show your puppy that YOU are in fact a bigger more aggressive dog - and YOU do not like the game they are playing - so YOU need to give the short sharp shock dominant barked "NO !" at them.

It is the same principle as having something loud to shake at them.

Some people say that they dare not hurt - or cannot get hold of the pup around the mouth - but it is worth a try - You must keep you pup on the bottom of the pile "pack-wise" - as that is where it will be most happiest. xx

Stephen XX
 

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I have always used the method Stephen has explained and it does put your puppy in its place, so don't be afraid to us it and in as short time the pup will learn that this means stop.
Its 6:15 am and I have just watched Poppy put Rosie in her place.
A bit of boisterous play and Rosie started to go to far, Poppy grabbed hold of her just firmly enough for her to yelp this calmed her down for a bit then she started again. Poppy stood over her and pushed her to the ground so she rolled onto her back grabbed her leg till she yelped, she kept her on her back till she calmed down then let her up, end of game. They are now both lying on their bed asleep.
Poppy is doing the job that I did to her to show her that she is bottom of the pile. I know this mite seem harsh but in the end you get a well behaved dog, they may still mouth your hand but without nipping you.
 

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Thank goodness its not just Dexter ........... when we first got him we all looked at one another with despair as we thought we had the naughtiest puppy in the world ....... we've used the mouth closed thing which does work but perserverance is a must as we don't need it very often now but time out works massively as my youngest is a target as Dex thinks he is an easy target but hes timing dex out behind the child gate and Bens got lots more respect from him!!! But we changed his food & that seems to have calmed him down & also walk him at 8pm to wear him out!!! Its hard work but i think everyone elses right its the hard work you put in at the beginning!! ;)
 

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...... but every so often she just goes wild and crazed and growls and bites and scratches and won't stop!! We both look like we self harm!!
Having sat and given this some thought - especially as several other people have reported similar traits - we can honestly say that we have not experienced such issues with any of our puppies nor have we had reports back asking for methods to resolve it either. If you fancied taking a look at one or two of our puppy "update" videos you will see them "at play" - this can get heated to a degree with pups but rarely if at all with humans.
We actually go through all the "dominance pack play" with our customers and explain the need for the hand over mouth bit in detail - as dogs are pack animals and respond to being kept at the bottom of the pile when in their new Family. We would be interested to hear of any JD pup that goes through these "frenzied" bouts to the degree of leaving marks.

We do use Working Cocker Mums partly for their famed "soft mouth" trait though ALL puppies will "play" using paws and mouth.

A simple question would be - Does Your breeder clip their puppy's nails before collection ??.......because puppies grow long hooks if left and these are very sharp - an easy way to tell if they need clipping is if the pup has difficulty walking on carpet or if the nails readily hook into jumpers.

As Julia had a dog grooming business - she baths; micro-chips; cleans ears and clips the nails of all our pups the day they are collected.

Stephen xx
 

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Really helpful for me as well to read this thread. Cider takes my children as his main target. And he has his mad half hour after his dinner time, before my kids go to bed! He seems like a compete different dog, but I love it that they crash out after and they are like little angels asleep. Lots is said in the thread already, but I only would suggest, to put Maisy for time out behind a stairgate or in a different room, rather than in her crate. We are working hard, that the crate is only a positive place with treats or food or simple for a nap in peace.
We put Cider in the crate at dinner time and we all sit right next to it at the table. I thought it will never work, but he settles right away and knows after waiting nicely for us having our dinner, it cannot be long for getting his :)
Good luck and enjoy the puppyhood
 

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......Cider takes my children as his main target.....
Hi Bini - Children are always the first "target" when an assertive pup thinks of moving up the pecking order. Pups in a litter "play fight" for a reason - they are always using this play to find and assert themselves within a "pack" environment - and when with their new families - children are the most likely to "play fight" with them not knowing that the pup is gauging the child's ability.
We always suggest that children don't end up playing the "hand game" with a pup as children who are considered should be lower in the pecking order will allow the pup to exert a more dominant role and then biting and growling can increase. If the pup is left to think it is scaling the social ladder in Your family - they become more anxious; more nervy and more aggressive as they feel it is their duty to protect and keep kids in line ! If your pup is shown that it is on the bottom of the pile (by slightly more assertive children putting them in their place too) pups normally relent - they are by far the most loving; playful; cuddly and happiest when at the bottom of ladder of Your family "pack".

Stephen x
 
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