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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just had this sent to me via Facebook and thought I'd share it as its relevant to all dogs. I'm not too sure about keeping them indoor in a dark room, unless its ridiculously hot, but maybe other more experienced owners can comment.

I don't know who to make this a sticky.

This is crossposted with permission from bulldog rescue however it applies to EVERY dog.

AS THE TEMPERATURES SORE TO OVER 30 DEGREES
Please follow these basic rules and please please please don't let your bulldog get too hot
DON'T take your dog outside during the day. Shut him in a room with a cool floor and draw the curtains to keep the sunlight out, if you do this early enough it will prevent the room from becoming warm as the sun comes into the room. Have an electric fan running in the room to keep the air circulating and make sure there is fresh water available at all times, put a dribble of apple cider vinegar in the water, it will help keep the phlegm levels down.

IF he needs to go outside - GO WITH HIM, don't let him lay out in the sun and bring him straight back in again when he's been to the toilet. Spray him with cold water if necessary to keep his skin cool.

If you are not home DON'T let him have free access to the garden, he WILL sun bathe and you will not be there to see when he's been out for too long.

DON'T walk your dog in this weather, it's still very hot at 8 or 9pm, wait until it's very late or walk very early in the morning - remember that tarmac also takes a while to cool off and even after the sun has gone down the roads can be very hot still.

DON'T force an overheating dog to drink water, offer water, but if refused don't force the issue. HE WILL DRINK IF HE WANTS TO - the worst thing you can do is force him to drink, he could vomit and choke.

MAKE sure NOW that you have in your cupboard a squeezy jiff lemon, use this FIRST if your dog is overheating, squirt it into the back of the dogs throat - it will break up the foam/phlegm in the throat. (Your dog will hate it but who cares)

LISTEN to your dog, panting is fine, this is the only way your dog can lose body heat, but listen for a roar - best described as sounding like an asthma attack. If your dog starts to roar IMMEDIATELY standing him in cold water, dogs only sweat through the pads of their feet and standing him in cold water has the same effect as putting a cold flannel on your head when you are hot.

IF HE'S ALREADY TOO HOT - Keep him stood in cold water, pour water over his head and especially around his neck, you need to cool the blood going to the brain, in severe cases of overheating there is a risk of brain damage from hot blood going to the brain.

Place ice under his tail (just inside his bottom if you can), keep pouring cold water over him and KEEP CALM, if you panic your dog will panic - if you suffer from asthma you will understand what I mean. Your dog will go very pale as the circulation system struggles to cope.

Keep going with the water - don't take him out of the bath until the breathing has calmed down, talk calmly to your dog - you will be soaked, your bathroom will be soaked, but you will save his life!!!!!!!!!

Once the breathing is calmer, remove him from the bath but don't dry him, he will shake up your walls and over you WHO CARES!!!! He will still be very pale (inside mouth, gums and inner eyes)

Let him wander, don't make a fuss of him, your fussing may panic him and it could start over again. Still don't force him to drink, but make up a rehydration mix and place it in a bowl for him to drink from if he wants to. You can make up your own rehydration mix:

500ml of water
2 and a half teaspoons of glucose powder
a quarter teaspoon of salt
a pinch of bicarbonate of soda
This mixture will keep in the fridge for 24 hours

If you cannot calm the dog in the bath GO STRAIGHT TO THE VET!!!! Soak a towel in cold water and lay the dog on top of it for the journey, take packets of frozen veggies and lay them on the back of his neck and on each side of his body. If the dog will lay upside down it will help him cool faster through his belly which has less fur on it but make sure that someone is with him to ensure he doesn't swallow his tongue!

IF YOU ARE AWAY FROM THE HOME: Find a river, pond, cow trough or knock a door, 7UP will do the same as the lemon juice in an emergency. Get in the river with your dog if necessary, but don't take him out until the breathing is calmer, unless he is obviously passing out in which case risk a speeding ticket and get to the nearest vet.

This all sounds very scary I know but I've had too many heartbroken families on the phone and I don't want any of you to be next.
 

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I think this should be made sticky! Some great advice. Hopefully none of our dogs will ever get to the extreme that some of the above advice is talking about. I was told by a vet last summer that a good way to cool a dog is on the pads of it's feet so a paddling pool is a good idea.
 

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Great post...thanks for reposting here. I had no idea how to deal with overheating...great to know before hotter days are here.

On an aside...can't say I agree with the comment about a speeding ticket tho. Its not gonna help your dog if you end up in a car accident.
 

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Yes, good advice. At puppy school they advised us to keep a wet towel in the car for after their walk, just to cool them down quickly. Tried it today, Oscar wore the wet towel like a saddle, he didn't even try to get it off!
 

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It does work. We used to do it with our greyhounds after they had run on hot days. Front feet in a bucket of water, wet towel over their back and a nice drink under their nose and never put back into a kennel until they are cooled off, calm and dry. You could tell they really appreciated it! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thats an interesting idea. My only worry is that I'd get a wet towel and it would be too warm by the time I need to use it :) I certainly keep water and a travel bowl in the car so Millie can always have a drink. As it gets hotter I'll take it with me on walks too.
 

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Yes, I thought about that too. Again puppy school had the solution!:)
Either half fill a cool box with cold water and pop the towel in or, and this is probably easier, take a dry towel and cold water in a bottle, then pour onto the towel after your walk. If you have public toilets or a water tap for doggy water bowls you could use these too. X
 

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All, especially Julie--.
I so appreciate you reporting that terrific summary of prevention and treatment for our guys. I live in the deep south "across the pond" from most of you, and in the last couple of weeks the real temperature has been over 38 degrees C, not counting any heat indexes, humidity or other weather labels the appear from time to time.
I keep inexpensive plastic Kiddie pools at both houses for the boys, (that OlliePup hates to have his feet in water, though. won't even go to do "his business " in the rain!). Mr Morgan knows he 's supposed to be a water loving little guy and will venture into the surf. When we travel from home to home-- (which is 500 mi round trip usually twice weekly) we stop, walk, water & mabe snack.
Keep cool
Monica
 

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I keep moist Aloe wipes in the cooler. While at the beach, I'll wipe Thatcher's ears and paws with them every half hour or so. It helps him cool and keeps the irritation of the sand from becoming a confusing factor (Sometimes a small wound with the addition of the salt water is difficult to distinguish from the effects of the heat).

We also have quick freeze packs that slip into the pockets of his harness which help cool him around his neck and shoulders with out adding much weight. He likes to roll on to his back while they are inserted in the harness and wiggle about on the ground.

I keep these to options handy as they do not take up much space or add to the possibility of a soggy auto.
 

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Just followed some of this advice. Nacho was scaring me - still is a bit but he's calming down. Just stuck him in the sink with some cool water and put an ice cube under his tail - he was not amused but thought it necessary - this was beyond a pant. He's been playing ball in the garden with my brothers whilst I was in a meeting. To say he is a hot dog is an understatement. Poor lad and so scary! No walk in this weather for him today! He's currently sat in the dark hallway in my office building lying on the cold floor lapping up a big bowl of water.

Can't thank this thread enough. :)
 

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And please during the summer heat keep your eyes open while walking thru car parks / parking lots for people who would leave their dogs in the car while in the store / shop. It only takes twenty minutes or less for dogs to circum to this intense heat while trapped in an automobile. If you do happen to come across this situation please do not walk by stop and get involved. You could be saving the dogs life.
 

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I have once called the RSPCA and police, as my friend and I happened to come across a dog left in a car on a very hot day, while its owners enjoyed food and refreshment in the pub. We called and sat in our car awaiting the dogs rescue. Fair play to the authorities, the police came and broke the car window as they deemed the dog in enough distress to do so before trying to locate the owner. They came out of the pub to find a smashed window but an alive dog, it's amazing how little thought some people afford their pets on a hot day :(
 

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It is so true...we were worried about lady while we were swimming...so hubby kept taking her for a little dunk...she did not go swimming willingly. but seemed happy while wet and cool.
 
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