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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi
There was an item on the news today about pet insurance and whether it is worth it when some of the cheaper policies don't cover certain things. I wondered what you think. Thanks.

Andrea
 

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You get what you pay for. One absolute must is to read all the terms and conditions, one horse insurance I had years ago required you to send a recorded delivery letter(before the days of emails) on the day you contacted the vet. It was hidden away in the small print and they would not pay out if you did not write. Easy to overlook in the stress of the moment!
 

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I have only had Molly since April and already claimed back more in insurance than I have paid in due to her having enteritis and then discovering her luxating patella. She is likely to need an operation at some point on each of her knees too which I am sure will probably run in the thousands by the time I have also sorted decent aftercare and physio for her.

One of my last dogs also had a serious spinal problem and just a few of the costs were MRI scan £1000, spinal surgery £2500, regular appointment with specialist £110 - the total amount I claimed for him over several years was probably around £8000.

I would rather have healthy dogs than have to have vet visits and insurance claims but at least I know if there is a big problem I am covered and decisions can be made about the best course of action without having to worry about the finances.
 

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I think 2ndhandgal's post was very helpful :)

Also Clare (Jedicrazy) had problems with Obi having meningitus which obviously costed a lot, but having insurance she didn't have to worry & Obi has made a full recovery which is brilliant :)

We have insurance for our two just incase... Even if they go through their lives & are fine at least we know we would have had them insured just incase.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hi
Thanks for your replies. I agree it's better to be safe than sorry especially after what happened to my niece's 6 month old Boston terrier on Boxing day. A friend picked Miley up but not firmly enough and Miley tried to jump out of his arms to my niece and he couldn't hold her and dropped her. She broke 2 bones in her leg and had to be operated on by a specialist vet and now has her leg in traction with metal bits and screws sticking out. I feel so sorry for the poor little pup. It's already cost at least £3000 but my niece does have insurance and hopes they will pay out the full amount as treatment will be ongoing for some time. It also pays to be careful who you let pick up your puppy.

Andrea x
 

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Hi
Thanks for your replies. I agree it's better to be safe than sorry especially after what happened to my niece's 6 month old Boston terrier on Boxing day. A friend picked Miley up but not firmly enough and Miley tried to jump out of his arms to my niece and he couldn't hold her and dropped her. She broke 2 bones in her leg and had to be operated on by a specialist vet and now has her leg in traction with metal bits and screws sticking out. I feel so sorry for the poor little pup. It's already cost at least £3000 but my niece does have insurance and hopes they will pay out the full amount as treatment will be ongoing for some time. It also pays to be careful who you let pick up your puppy.

Andrea x
That is so sad, I hope the puppy makes a full recovery. My breeder did warn of this when we said we had kids.
 

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Hi
Thanks for your replies. I agree it's better to be safe than sorry especially after what happened to my niece's 6 month old Boston terrier on Boxing day. A friend picked Miley up but not firmly enough and Miley tried to jump out of his arms to my niece and he couldn't hold her and dropped her. She broke 2 bones in her leg and had to be operated on by a specialist vet and now has her leg in traction with metal bits and screws sticking out. I feel so sorry for the poor little pup. It's already cost at least £3000 but my niece does have insurance and hopes they will pay out the full amount as treatment will be ongoing for some time. It also pays to be careful who you let pick up your puppy.

Andrea x
This is so true Andrea and appears to be quite common. A local family got a King Charles pup and their son (6 yrs old) also accidently dropped him and he ended up with his leg in plaster. Not quite such a serious break but very sad.
 

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How many of these insurers pay the vet directly ?
I just got stung with the bill for a spay with overnight stay and a hernia to boot and I had to pay upfront then fill out all sorts of forms to claim it back !
In my experience it is more a question of vets accepting to be paid directly by the insurance company. The place my boy had him MRI scan were happy to claim directly from some insurance companies, the specialist vet preferred to be paid directly with me claiming it back. With my normal vet I pay them directly and claim back every few months.
 
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