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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

Your posts have been invaluable in allaying some of my fears about owning a dog.

I've been scared of dogs since I was a child and got bitten. However over the years the fear has faded to a wariness and an aversion to the work, mess and noise created by a dog.

I've finally given in to my son's pleading for a dog, after 7 years of mulling it over, and we just went to see and bought a little red cockapoo puppy last weekend. I fell in love on sight - he is just the cutest little thing.

Spent the last few weeks getting the infrastructure sorted. My time off work for a few weeks. Puppy daycare. A dog walker when I go back to work, rearranging the furniture to make room for his crate - etc... This has helped calm me down and not be so aprehensive about the puppy.

What's worrying me most at the moment is the toilet training and the biting/nipping.

Would greatly appreciate any help.
 

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My you are brave!
Easy for all of us dog mad nutty people to get puppies, but you are starting your journey from a different place - however it sounds as if your pup has already got you wrapped around his paw.
Puppies do have needle sharp teeth and they do pee and poop.... Prepare yourself for the worst and you'll probably find it is not so bad. Tired puppies can be more bitey.
Get yourself a little treat bag that you can carry around with you which can have some bits of kibble and a pair of knotted together old socks. Tiny pups learn to sit very quickly for a treat and if you have a toy on hand to play with him with, he'll bite on that more than you.... Right from the start teach sit, by holding a bit of kibble close to his nose and lifting it up slightly (head up, bottom down). Reward immediately his bum hits the floor. Just use some of his normal food - not special treats until he is older. You can also teach him to leave the knotted sock toy in the same way. You will feel more more in control when you realise he listens to you and does what you ask - don't expect too much straight away, but you will be surprised by how much he can learn.
 

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Brave and a very understanding mum.:) A boy who wants a pup is a boy who needs a pup in my book and having a mum who is willing to set aside her own misgivings and to jump in head first to tackle her own fears is a very good start! It sounds like you are in really good shape with the time off and day care.

My advice would be to find some experienced dog loving allies to walk with and play with who can help you and your son learn to speak dog and your pup learn to speak human. It definitely gets easier once you get that bit sorted out.:)
 

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Congrats on your new pup - can't wait to see pics.
Don't worry about the pee and the poop - it can be cleaned up and it doesn't last forever (drink wine - it helps!!)
As for the nipping & biting, it will happen and it can hurt. As said, they are most bitey when tired and over excited.
A couple of nylon ones or antler chews may come in very handy x
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you all for your support. Been feeling like the most awful Mum for denying my son his dog for years. Would have been worse for me if we had got one then found we couldn't cope. Hence the looooooooong wait until I was absolutely positive I could do this. And my son is old enough now at 13 to help.
 

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Thank you all for your support. Been feeling like the most awful Mum for denying my son his dog for years. Would have been worse for me if we had got one then found we couldn't cope. Hence the looooooooong wait until I was absolutely positive I could do this. And my son is old enough now at 13 to help.
My son is 13, (great age to get a dog) we got Dudley 2 years ago - but it had been me waiting and wanting to get a dog since I was a young child, my mum never did give in! (but hubby eventually did thank goodness). Good luck, it sounds as if you are pretty prepared so I'm sure you will be fine, you may have a wobbly moment or two but you sound as if you will get through that stage ok.
 

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Good for you. I understand your trepidation as I too was bitten at the age of 11 and needed 14 stitches in my arm. I have had to overcome my fears over many years as I didnt want my kids to be scared of dogs. We are now into week three of having our puppy (he is 9.5 weeks) and the biting is annoying and sometimes painful but when he does get a little overzealous I pop him in his playpen to give us both a break. It is very true that tired puppies are more bitey so lots of sleep in his crate is in order. I hope my fears don't return when out dog walking and a less friendly dog approaches as I would imagine my puppy would be able to pick up on this.

I'm so glad I've committed to our little chap - we all love him despite his biting and it is wonderful to see the children's relationship with him developing.
 

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MissesT you are a smart, smart woman. Having a dog will help all of you see that 99% of dogs are loving, obedient and friendly. This is even more true than ever now that people know how important socialization is. People with not so friendly dogs will send clear signals as you approach to watch out. You'll see them tighten the lead, cross the street or even call out to you. If in doubt I call out "is your dog friendly?"

The toughest part will be when your pup transitions at about four months in the eyes of older dogs and they do the time honoured tradition of teaching him some big dog manners. Suddenly nice big dogs will seem to turn on your poor defenseless puppy and your heart will pound. Leave them to it, they won't really hurt him and if he doesn't learn the lessons they have to teach he'll never be able to manage properly and he'll be one of the ones you are pulling away from others as you walk. It is a terrifying but necessary rite of passage! Walking with experienced dog loving friends will help.:)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you

Wow. Been trawling through this site for the last couple of weeks and have only come across enthusiastic poo owners. Makes me feel far less anxious and alone to know that there are others out there who have had similar fears and the total empathy and support from every one else.

I'm the sort of person who needs solutions. Just gone out and bought the thickest animal gloves I could find!!!!!! :D I'm all prepared for the little biter now!!! ;)
 

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Puppy teeth are sharp - as are thorns.... I don't think anyone on here has been permanently scarred by their pup. If gloves make you feel more confident I suppose they might be a good idea, but you'll miss out on feeling that soft puppy fur and gentle licky tongue. Also they might make it more difficult for you to handle your pup sensitively, he will only be a tiny baby when he comes home.
Be calm and gentle with him and he will learn to be the same with you.
Encourage your son to be consistant too - having boys myself I know how much they enjoy a bit of rough play and don't seem remotely bothered by snappy crocapoos - even encouraging it :eek: that said pups are clever and mine played differently with the boys to with me and Liz who preferred not to play games involving teeth.
You will be fine - I'm looking forward to reading about how your pup initiates you into your new role as crazy dog lady ;)
 

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I would suggest spending some more time with dogs, and getting accustomed to dogs before getting one.
Puppies are not sweet little bundles of wonderful, they can hurt, they can be gremlins, they can be really tough to deal with. they are lovely, but the puppy stage is absolutely HARD WORK!
I think handling a pup with gloves on is not allowing the puppy to get accustomed to you. and remember our dogs feed off our emotions, if you are feeling scared, it can make the pup act out. if you are feeling anything but calm and collected the puppy will stress you out, and it will become stressed out its self.
 

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What Mo said.

My sister got chased and bit by a large black lab when she was little. And she always was afraid of dogs until she decided she wanted one. She got her boy from the pound and the poor thing was more frightened than she was. I think that helped her pull it together and be a really good pair. Both were wounded and both took care of each other. But her dog pooped and peed inside for its whole life. It was scared and wimped out pretty quickly. It was sweet and wanted to be held by someone he trusted all of the time. But it was never properly socialized and the poor dog always got beaten up, attacked by other dogs. Rarely will you read on here that the cockapoo was aggressive (razor sharp puppy teeth and mad doodle dashing do not count). But you will read other dogs whom they have encountered on walks or at the park who are aggressive. And through no fault of your own, if something happens to your poo, you need to be able to react calmly, like Donna did when Jake got bit out of the blue. If you get anxious/scared while walking your poo when another dog approaches, she will notice and become "aggressive" to protect you. Mine do that all of the time and I have to remind myself to be calm.

I totally understand how awesome getting everyone's encouragement from here can be as I was there. But very recently there was someone who has to rehome because it didn't work out. Maybe I have it wrong but my two are my babies and wanted to do everything to keep them with me. I spent all but a few hours the first couple of months making sure they would be ok together since they are littermates. These two have destroyed lots and lots of things and I've learned to put the responsibility where it belongs, my fault for leaving within reach. I've spent countless $$$ on vet bills, food, treats, daycare on top of that so that they are taken care of. I've given up most of my personal time so that the extra time I have is focused on them. And I write all this to give you an idea of how in ways this isn't easy. For all of that I wouldn't change one single moment, not even the Gucci bag that now only has one handle.

I apologize for the long post but I think taking steps Mo mentioned, such as meeting with other dogs, and getting comfortable with barking, growling, fast movement that may trigger old memories may be even more important in having the lifelong, wonderful poo experience.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Just to reassure you guys. The gloves were only to be used as a last resort, if puppy decided to get into a mood and was continuously spinning round trying to bite me whilst I tried to get him into his "time out" spot. I wouldn't dream having them on all the time. Love the softness of doggy fur through my fingers.

Really appreciate all your suggestions for spending some time with dogs. I only decided I was ready for a puppy, after spending the last two years in close proximity with the puppy / adolescent now adult springer spaniel of a close friend and neighbour. Went through all the ups and downs with them. I also live in a small village which is dog crazy - so most of my friends up and down the road are all dog owners, whom I've spent a lot of time with - including walks, baths etc.

This is all well and good, but the training and bad behaviour of the puppies are someone else's problem. Much like a child, you get to give them back to the parents, once you're done. It's taking on the responsibility of training and ensuring good behaviour myself that is slightly daunting.

However - I've done a reasonable job of raising a 13 year old - so planning on using the same tactics. Keep your fingers crossed for me.

I'm doing all the research - reading anything on cockapoos and training etc I can find. Have all the paraphenalia bought already. Including cordoning off a large portion of the kitchen with puppy gates and putting foam alphabet tiles down - was hoping it would be easier to clean and nicer for the puppy. Have also already interviewed and arranged puppy day care, dog walking during the day for when he is slightly older, puppy socialisation classes and puppy training. And asking loads and loads and loads of questions.

Not sure what more I can do to prepare myself.

Greatly appreciate your feedback - don't worry about long posts. The more information I have the calmer I feel about this new adventure.
 

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Sounds like you will be just fine and you are very well prepared!:) The foam alphabet blocks sound yummy, Rufus would have demolished them in very short order, hopefully your pup will be a less voracious reader.:D If you can raise a son to age thirteen and still love him enough to get him a puppy you can definitely, definitely do puppyhood!:)
 
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