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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know it's a phase that puppies go through (although my cav never did) but Dexter is so bitey at the moment! He has so may toys to chew but wants to chew hands , feet or clothes (that people are wearing!) and when I make a loud noise or say No firmly he thinks its a wonderful game and it seems to egg him on! What have others done at this bitey stage?
 

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Hi Tessy

Our Cav never went through the biting stage either. With Beau we tried all that you have but then started to say a firm NO and if she did it again she got time out in another room for a couple of minutes which she hated and within a day or so she was much better. She still occiasionally does it but it is more of a friendly mouthing that proper biting which was very painful. It does get better :)
 

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We are going through this stage at the moment with Ellie too. she also gets very excited if you yelp when she bites and it makes her bite even more!!

With Maisy we tried everything, time out or getting up and walking away was about the best solution for her, although if she was in her 'mad' mood nothing seemed to work!

Just as you think the biting stage is never going to end you start to notice that they are biting less and less, it is just a stage but it can be very tiresome! Hang on in there and just try and be consistent with the time out if that's what starts to work, would be what I would suggest :)
 

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The trick here is to act as the bigger more aggressive "dog".

If you watch dogs and puppies play - things normally reach a point where the more dominant dog decides enough is enough and snaps; snarls and gives a short; sharp BARK at the other dog / puppy.
Sounds like your puppy is playing a "dominance" game - when puppies are growing they will play-fight - all cute and fun and innocent looking - BUT hides the fact that they are genuinely working out who amongst them are top dog - they develop a hierarchy within the litter from an early age.

In order to put a stop to - biting; mouthing and/or hanging off clothes - YOU MUST be the bigger more aggressive "dog" and educate the puppy that YOU are boss.

If your puppy does any of the above (and it can look like playtime) - then get hold of the puppy around it's muzzle (nose) and gently squeeze and say "NO !" in a firm 'gruff, bark like voice' - squeeze until the puppy squeaks and pulls away (and allow the puppy to pull it's self away from your grip). Most puppies will understand quickly but a more assertive puppy will come back at you again (and maybe a couple of times) - this is a "game" YOU MUST WIN - so if it does come back - get hold of it with a firmer grip and a louder "NO!!" (almost "bark" the "NO" at it !). As soon as the puppy backs down and you win, immediately go back to normal.

Remember - this is a learning curve for your dog / puppy - and you are just letting it know who is boss - puppies will be happiest if they are at the bottom of the pecking order in the household - as it means they will be looked after. Any puppy feeling that it needs to go up in the pecking order will ultimately get more stressed as it is looking to take on a role where it has to "look after; protect and be a provider" for YOU.

I know it sounds harsh to squeeze the muzzle until they squeak /yelp and pull away - BUT puppies don't hold grudges !!!! - as soon as the lesson is learnt and understood - they can happily come to you for hugs and cuddles too without issue.

This is something WE have observed and learnt first hand - it works (if done correctly - and assertively) without any physical or phycological damage to the puppy - we offer this advice to all our customers and it is clearly worded in our "Idiot's Guide" that also goes with each of our puppies in our "Puppy Pack".

Stephen xx
 

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I agree with Stephen - Rosie got through the first puppy mouthing stage with just a 'no' and a time out. But she has now started it up again, and her teeth are much bigger this time! So, I think we need the more 'aggressive' approach. I have already done the muzzle thing a few times and she deinitely doesn't hold it against me!

Stephen - I'd love a copy of your idiot's guide, if that's possible? Could you bring one on Sunday? (I know Rosie isn't a JD puppy, but I promise that if my husband ever relents about a second dog, you will be top of my list of breeders to come and see - and Janice too, of course!)
 

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I agree with Stephen - Rosie got through the first puppy mouthing stage with just a 'no' and a time out. But she has now started it up again, and her teeth are much bigger this time! So, I think we need the more 'aggressive' approach. I have already done the muzzle thing a few times and she deinitely doesn't hold it against me!

Stephen - I'd love a copy of your idiot's guide, if that's possible? Could you bring one on Sunday? (I know Rosie isn't a JD puppy, but I promise that if my husband ever relents about a second dog, you will be top of my list of breeders to come and see - and Janice too, of course!)


That's a good idea - we will print some off and bring them on Sunday.

Stephen x
 

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The trick here is to act as the bigger more aggressive "dog".



In order to put a stop to - biting; mouthing and/or hanging off clothes - YOU MUST be the bigger more aggressive "dog" and educate the puppy that YOU are boss.

If your puppy does any of the above (and it can look like playtime) - then get hold of the puppy around it's muzzle (nose) and gently squeeze and say "NO !" in a firm 'gruff, bark like voice' - squeeze until the puppy squeaks and pulls away (and allow the puppy to pull it's self away from your grip). Most puppies will understand quickly but a more assertive puppy will come back at you again (and maybe a couple of times) - this is a "game" YOU MUST WIN - so if it does come back - get hold of it with a firmer grip and a louder "NO!!" (almost "bark" the "NO" at it !). As soon as the puppy backs down and you win, immediately go back to normal.


Stephen xx
I used this method with Rufus and it worked a treat. Rufus was an assertive puppy. After I collected him at 8 wks old he barked for the whole of the three and a half hour journey home .......oh, apart from when he was pooping!:laugh:
He did lots of play biting - which hurts with those needle teeth! He would charge down the length of the kitchen and sink his teeth into my leg. I still have holes in my dog walking jeans as evidence! We found the most effective method that worked was the one described by Stephen. It soon stops. Honest!

Karen x
 

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If it makes you feel any better Obi is doing the same at the moment. He has got particularly bad this week :eek: You should see my daughters hands and arms...I am having to separate them a lot at the moment. Yesterday at puppy class all the 6 owners were asked to keep swopping dogs (on lead) so the dog could be used to someone else touching them. Obi was fine at first and then by owner no 3 he started biting because he thought it was a great game. He was the only one who did it :eek: The trainer gave him a firm telling off.
 

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Stephen I think your acting as the bigger more aggressive "dog" is spot on.
I am a believer in you having to show the puppy its place in the pack. I would never condone violence, but to mimic the behavior of an older dog as you describe is the right way to go, I still use this method on Poppy as a correction.

I gave Poppy a bone today so I could supervise her with Rosie to see if we are going to have any problems with food guarding. Poppy gave a very low growl and I corrected her, and she allowed Rosie to sniff the bone then stood up and took the bone away, Rosie followed her, she gave another growl Rosie didn't go any closer but lay on the floor and watched Poppy have good gnaw at the bone. when I took the bone off Poppy she allowed Rose to help her hoover up to small bits of bone with no sign of aggression. This to me was the pack order working as it should.
 

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Our Poppy is nearly 17 weeks now, and we thought she was coming through the biting stage. However, the last couple of days have been particularly bad - although the kids do seem to start off the tussles, which end up with them getting nipped, especially hands and ankles! Just noticed this morning though that she is missing her first tooth!! Wasn't expecting this so soon (is this too early?). The kids think she should get £1 in her cage tonight :D
 

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Eddie tries to mouth my daughter who is 19, but he obviously sees her below him in the pack order - he doesn't do this with the rest of the family.

I have explained Jukee Doodles method to her to try out - hope it works as he is nearly 10 months old and although he isn't biting her it still hurts!
 

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Holding Poppy's mouth closed (JD method) doesn't work when she is really excited, so will have a go with the noise thing. Will have to raid the kids musical instrument box to see if there's something suitable ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Michelle I have visions of you playing your childrens' percussion instruments at Poppy and it's really making me laugh!
I really can't hold Dexter's mouth, I've tried- it's too small and his teeth are too sharp!
 

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Holding Poppy's mouth closed (JD method) doesn't work when she is really excited, so will have a go with the noise thing. Will have to raid the kids musical instrument box to see if there's something suitable ;)
I tried the holding the mouth closed method and it didn't work for me either, in fact Ellie was in such a frantic, excited state she bit me when I let go!

Talked to my trainer tonight and she said biting, excitable puppies are like toddlers having tanturms, the best way to deal with them is to remove them from the situation, ignore them and stay calm. There are lots of different opinions out there, I think you just have to go with what works for you :)
 

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with Echo i held her lower jaw when she put in round my had my way of saying "if you want to put my hand in your mouth then i decide when my hand comes out" worked well with Echo, she would pull back and cray a little wanting me to let go. but just made Delta worse when i tried it on her, i honestly cant remember what we ended up doing with Delta, she still on ocasion iff over exited jumps up and catches my hand, but it is happening less.

with all my girls now i can put my hand in their mouths and then take their mouth alway from my hand gently, so its never had a negative afect on them letting me touch their mouths.


i think it is a phaze that they do grow out off if you are consistent
 

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Hi my puppy Ruby has been great with all of us except my youngest son whos 10. She can be fine with him for ages but then growl and nip. Yesterday when he was with her she bit the back of his leg. We have been doing time out but im going to try the holding muzzle and barking no thing. Cant have her feeling in charge of anyone.
 
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