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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Young Spartacus is 6 months old now and having his check up at the vets tomorrow. He's a very happy dog with no signs of agression or humping!
I would be interested on views about whether we should consider having him snipped. Have no plans to breed him but dont want to cause him any pain/discomfort. What do you think?
Thanks.
 

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We had Dylan done at 7-8 months. Vets highly recommend it for health reasons, but one of my main reasons was to minimise aggression from other male dogs, as Dylan had been attacked early in life. I think that it has done that, although there was a period of a few months when all the male dogs would keep sniffing and trying to hump him, as the scent is confusing for a while after castration. But that has stopped now. I also had a friend with a cockapoo who had aggression and humping problems when she left him entire and eventually got him done much later.
The op is very minimal and seemed to cause Dylan no pain. He never tried to even lick the area. The worst part is the buster collar (which I barely used) and not being able to walk him properly for 10 days, but that is soon over. I am glad that I had him done.
 

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I had Rufus neutered at 6 months. It seemed so major at the time but now I look back it was 'inconvenient' due to the buster collar (which Rufus needed on 24/7!!) and the lead walking but I'm really glad I got him done. A friend's in tact male dog has a dreadful time when a local bitch is in season - he's broken out a few times and goes all sad and frustrated, bless him! I also agree with what Dylansmum said about potential attacks in parks etc.
I have recently found kinder buster collars around. A local pet shop sells a padded version and several friends have recommended the Comfy Collar, which is more like a rubber ring which you blow up. :)

Karen x
 

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If you are not planning to stud him then maybe get him done.

My cockapoo Oakley an entire male and although he is great with other dogs, other males dogs do sniff around him and one did get a little aggressive towards Oakley. I believe neutered males are calmer too and for health reasons your vet may recommend him being neutered too. saying that my friends have an entire male lab and he is very calm but I remember he was destructive around the home for some time when he was younger.

I would like to have a litter from Oakley but the day will come when he will be neutered as I think this is the best for him. Also entire males will scent more than neutered dogs I believe. On my blog I have included a post about Oakley scenting up me, yes me, I am not sure a neutered male would do that.... I have spoken to many breeders about entire males and they do tend to do this, plus they can become rather focused when they pick up a scent of a bitch in season.
 

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I also thought about this for a long time with our dog but in the end went for the snip. As like everyone has said there seemed no reason on behaviour grounds to do it but I know vets recommend on health grounds amongst other reasons.Also I think its a little unfair to have an entire male with ALL HIS URGES and no way to relieve those urges;) EVER!!!!!!! I think most males would agree:D
So Weller went for the chop and was a bit out of sorts for a while but soon bounced back and it hasn't changed his personality at all......job done:)
 

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Can only add that Wilf is neutered and has never scented anywhere inside. He was lethargic for a couple of days after op, didnt really use a collar as he left it alone, just not being able to go for a walk was the issue, but soon over x
 

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Ahh so the scenting indoors may be for just entire males ... Oakley has done it up my kitchen bin and up me (not so funny!!!, well it was actually) .. I thought maybe Honey was coming into season and started packing his bags to go and stay with nanny and grandad.. then I thought she had a colourless season or possibly a split season .... was a weird time :S
 

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non of our males either neutered or unneutered have scented indoors, but you often find dogs that have been used as studs **** their leg in the house:eek:

please do plenty of reseach OP before you have your puppy neutered, because research has showed that neutering too early can be detrimental to the health of the puppy later on
 

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please do plenty of reseach OP before you have your puppy neutered, because research has showed that neutering too early can be detrimental to the health of the puppy later on
Interested to know more about this. What is considered too early then and what are the issues? My vet said from 5 months but I just haven't got round to organising anything yet and given it's the summer holidays I might wait till the kids go back to school in Sep anyway.
 

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Interested to know more about this. What is considered too early then and what are the issues? My vet said from 5 months but I just haven't got round to organising anything yet and given it's the summer holidays I might wait till the kids go back to school in Sep anyway.
heres some info on it, i believe it can also affect the growth plates, so i would just do as much research as you can then its up to you what you decide, my vet wouldnt neuter until a dog started to **** its leg:)

On the negative side, neutering male dogs
• if done before 1 year of age, significantly increases the risk of osteosarcoma (bone cancer); this is a
common cancer in medium/large and larger breeds with a poor prognosis.
• increases the risk of cardiac hemangiosarcoma by a factor of 1.6
• triples the risk of hypothyroidism
• increases the risk of progressive geriatric cognitive impairment
• triples the risk of obesity, a common health problem in dogs with many associated health problems
• quadruples the small risk (<0.6%) of prostate cancer
• doubles the small risk (<1%) of urinary tract cancers
• increases the risk of orthopedic disorders
• increases the risk of adverse reactions to vaccinations


http://www.naiaonline.org/pdfs/longtermhealtheffectsofspayneuterindogs.pdf
 

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heres some info on it, i believe it can also affect the growth plates, so i would just do as much research as you can then its up to you what you decide, my vet wouldnt neuter until a dog started to **** its leg:)

On the negative side, neutering male dogs
• if done before 1 year of age, significantly increases the risk of osteosarcoma (bone cancer); this is a
common cancer in medium/large and larger breeds with a poor prognosis.
• increases the risk of cardiac hemangiosarcoma by a factor of 1.6
• triples the risk of hypothyroidism
• increases the risk of progressive geriatric cognitive impairment
• triples the risk of obesity, a common health problem in dogs with many associated health problems
• quadruples the small risk (<0.6%) of prostate cancer
• doubles the small risk (<1%) of urinary tract cancers
• increases the risk of orthopedic disorders
• increases the risk of adverse reactions to vaccinations


http://www.naiaonline.org/pdfs/longtermhealtheffectsofspayneuterindogs.pdf
Thank you Jenny, I'll take a good look at all of this and weigh it all up. I'm not in any mad rush to do it as no behaviour issues that could be helped by it but I know I will at some point as I want a second dog and I'd like a girl next time.
 

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I've got Coco booked in tomorrow morning to have him done. He will be nearly 8 months old the vet said from 6 months is fine. I'm having it done so if he gets out and finds a girlfriend there will be no accidents:)

When i told the receptionist what breed he was he said "oh dear" wasn't impressed with that remark.
 

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Thank you Jenny, I'll take a good look at all of this and weigh it all up. I'm not in any mad rush to do it as no behaviour issues that could be helped by it but I know I will at some point as I want a second dog and I'd like a girl next time.
Thats ok:) best of luck with whatever you decide.
 

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non of our males either neutered or unneutered have scented indoors, but you often find dogs that have been used as studs **** their leg in the house:eek:

please do plenty of reseach OP before you have your puppy neutered, because research has showed that neutering too early can be detrimental to the health of the puppy later on
Jenny so you have both neutered or unneutered dog that live in your house but don't scent inside the house.. is this right?

How many neutered males do you have?
How many unneutered?
Are your unneutered dogs active stud dogs?

My dog is not a stud dog, but he is unneutered and yes I have experienced him scenting up my kitchen bin..... and scenting up me when I was bent over.. long story .. but yes scenting indoors twice...

Guess he will be a great stud dog or he is just a naughty gorgeous boy :) :)
 

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Jenny so you have both neutered or unneutered dog that live in your house but don't scent inside the house.. is this right?

How many neutered males do you have?
How many unneutered?
Are your unneutered dogs active stud dogs?

My dog is not a stud dog, but he is unneutered and yes I have experienced him scenting up my kitchen bin..... and scenting up me when I was bent over.. long story .. but yes scenting indoors twice...

Guess he will be a great stud dog or he is just a naughty gorgeous boy :) :)
No i dont have any dogs at the moment our last one passed away 18 months ago he wasnt neutered as it happens, i was speaking about past dogs and i know its a fact that many dogs used to stud do get very dirty indoors:eek:

Maybe your lads just having a blip:p
 

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Gosh ... re health issues.. I must admit I just went along with my vets suggestion... I wonder why they recommend doing it so young then, or a t least dont explain so that you can make an informed choice ??

And Lois ... the rude cheeky mare :mad:
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
The Vet said snip him!

Thanks to everybody for their feedback. My vet advised that she thought it a wise move to have him snipped in a month or two as the benefits far outweigh the risks. So Spartacus will be 'lees of a man' in a few months time but hopefully better off in the long run!
 

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Bunnyman .. you have made the right choice .. asked your vet .. Spartacus will be fine and I always trust my vets advise.

Karen .. don't worry .. you were right having Wilf done.. I would have had Oakley done by now if I didn't want to have a litter... Oakley will be done at some point .. but again I will speak to my vet before doing anything.
 

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My vet was the opposite he didnt agree with early neutering, he said it affected the growth plates and the studies that have been done seem to back his beliefs up. There is plenty of info out there for people to make an informed choice, i would check out any studies that either prove or disprove this opinion and not take a vets word as gospel imo:).

A study by Salmeri et al in 1991 found that bitches spayed at 7 weeks grew significantly taller than those spayed at 7 months, who were taller than those not spayed (or presumably spayed after the growth plates had closed).(1) A study of 1444 Golden Retrievers performed in 1998 and 1999 also found bitches and dogs spayed and neutered at less than a year of age were significantly taller than those spayed or neutered at more than a year of age.(2) The *** hormones, by communicating with a number of other growth-related hormones, promote the closure of the growth plates at puberty (3), so the bones of dogs or bitches neutered or spayed before puberty continue to grow. Dogs that have been spayed or neutered well before puberty can frequently be identified by their longer limbs, lighter bone structure, narrow chests and narrow skulls. This abnormal growth frequently results in significant alterations in body proportions and particularly the lengths (and therefore weights) of certain bones relative to others. For example, if the femur has achieved its genetically determined normal length at 8 months when a dog gets spayed or neutered, but the tibia, which normally stops growing at 12 to 14 months of age continues to grow, then an abnormal angle may develop at the stifle. In addition, with the extra growth, the lower leg below the stifle likely becomes heavier (because it is longer), and may cause increased stresses on the cranial cruciate ligament. In addition, *** hormones are critical for achieving peak bone density.(4) These structural and physiological alterations may be the reason why at least one recent study showed that spayed and neutered dogs had a higher incidence of CCL rupture.(5) Another recent study showed that dogs spayed or neutered before 5 1/2 months had a significantly higher incidence of hip dysplasia than those spayed or neutered after 5 1/2 months of age, although it should be noted that in this study there were no standard criteria for the diagnosis of hip dysplasia.(6) Nonetheless, breeders of purebred dogs should be cognizant of these studies and should consider whether or not pups they bred were spayed or neutered when considering breeding decisions.
Cancer Considerations
A retrospective study of cardiac tumors in dogs showed that there was a 5 times greater risk of hemangiosarcoma, one of the three most common cancers in dogs, in spayed bitches than intact bitches and a 2.4 times greater risk of hemangiosarcoma in neutered dogs as compared to intact males.(7) A study of 3218 dogs demonstrated that dogs that were neutered before a year of age had a significantly increased chance of developing bone cancer.(8) A separate study showed that neutered dogs had a two-fold higher risk of developing bone cancer.(9) Despite the common belief that neutering dogs helps prevent prostate cancer, at least one study suggests that neutering provides no benefit.(10) There certainly is evidence of a slightly increased risk of mammary cancer in female dogs after one heat cycle, and for increased risk with each subsequent heat. While about 30 % of mammary cancers are malignant, as in humans, when caught and surgically removed early the prognosis is very good.(12) Luckily, canine athletes are handled frequently and generally receive prompt veterinary care.
Behavioral Considerations
The study that identified a higher incidence of cranial cruciate ligament rupture in spayed or neutered dogs also identified an increased incidence of sexual behaviors in males and females that were neutered early.(5) Further, the study that identified a higher incidence of hip dysplasia in dogs neutered or spayed before 5 1/2 months also showed that early age gonadectomy was associated with an increased incidence of noise phobias and undesirable sexual behaviors.(6) A recent report of the American Kennel Club Canine Health Foundation reported significantly more behavioral problems in spayed and neutered bitches and dogs. The most commonly observed behavioral problem in spayed females was fearful behavior and the most common problem in males was aggression.(12)
Other Health Considerations
A number of studies have shown that there is an increase in the incidence of female urinary incontinence in dogs spayed early (13), although this finding has not been universal. Certainly there is evidence that ovarian hormones are critical for maintenance of genital tissue structure and contractility.(14, 15) Neutering also has been associated with an increased likelihood of urethral sphincter incontinence in males.(16) This problem is an inconvenience, and not usually life-threatening, but nonetheless one that requires the dog to be medicated for life. A health survey of several thousand Golden Retrievers showed that spayed or neutered dogs were more likely to develop hypothyroidism.(2) This study is consistent with the results of another study in which neutering and spaying was determined to be the most significant gender-associated risk factor for development of hypothyroidism.(17) Infectious diseases were more common in dogs that were spayed or neutered at 24 weeks or less as opposed to those undergoing gonadectomy at more than 24 weeks.(18) Finally, the AKC-CHF report demonstrated a higher incidence of adverse reactions to
 
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